2017 book 2 complete: Rose in Bloom, by Louisa May Alcott

rose-in-bloom-cover

Much like it’s prequel, ‘Rose in Bloom’ is delightful and heart-warming. It is filled with good and true ideals, presenting a delicious view of life through a crystal clear lens which allows the beauty of things both large and small to be fully absorbed.

Rose returns from two years abroad with Uncle Alec & Pheobe (her best friend & former kitchen maid) to find her seven boy cousins quite grown up, or at least altered in their current climb to manhood. Being an heiress, she is tried by having lines of suitors, all whom she rejects due to their lack of integrity; people she thought were friends, who prove not to be; and a particular cousin whom she loves dearly, insists on wooing her despite her openness in being averse to his wayward behaviour.

Rose has chosen philanthropy as her “profession”, since she has money at her disposal and need not work for it. She tackles many projects including settling up low-rent homes for women in need, and an orphanage. She does good by her fellow man, receiving little to no credit or gratitude but for that from her Uncle Alec, yet musters on with the satisfaction and contentment of knowing she is loving and caring for others as best she can. This care still includes that of great-aunt Plenty, Uncle Alec, and eventually Rose adopts a toddler orphan girl whose mother was promised her daughter would be cared for. She goes about doing all she can for those she loves, including sacrifices to encourage the “Prince” to drop his prominent vice and become the man she believes him capable of being.

Mac, the “bookworm”, continues to be a considerable character along with “Prince” Charlie in this sequel. Charlie is dear to her due to his charm and unfailing ability to seek back her favour whenever it goes amiss due to his actions, just as he did as a boy. Mac is admired due to his trustworthiness, uncanny, blunt and philosophical nature, which continues to marvel Rose as she urges him to round his character somewhat by putting his books down on the occasional evening and go into society, learn to dance, etc. As his cousins around him fall in love, Mac takes interest in studying the subject and sets out to “keep good company, read good books, love good things, and cultivate soul and body as faithfully as [he] can.”

Tragedy strikes, young lovers persevere through obstacles, each cousin growing and learning along their various paths. I won’t give away the ending, for you should read it yourself and take in the various virtues and qualities Alcott promotes in her writings.

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2 thoughts on “2017 book 2 complete: Rose in Bloom, by Louisa May Alcott

  1. This became one of my favourite books after discovering it only last year… Mac is a brilliant character who combines the best of Theodore Laurence and Friedrich Bhaer in Little Women; Jo March I find a preferable heroine, but I like Rose for her perseverance in doing things for others without glory. Mac’s speech I think rivals Laurie’s passionate appeal to Jo, and even Darcy’s misguided proposal to Elizabeth, in potency. (In the full version only – there are some versions of Rose in Bloom out there that sadly truncate this speech to two sentences.)

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    • Ah yes! I hadn’t thought of Mac as a combination of the endearing qualities of both Laurie and professor Bhaer. Mac certainly is a wonderful character.
      I think Rose’s character actually has more qualities of Amy and Meg. I like her steadfastness, but Jo is perhaps a bit more exciting – and therefore more appealing to many women.
      Mac’s speech is one of the best! How unfortunate for the reader who happens upon a copy that butchers it! *gasp!*

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